Do You Need to Supplement Your Cat’s Diet with Vitamins and Minerals?

Despite obvious physiology differences, your cat is not that different from you. Just as humans, cats require vitamins and minerals to survive. Whether or not you need to supplement your cat’s diets with vitamins depends largely on their diet and current health status.

The vitamins that cats need include both fat soluble and water-soluble vitamins. These vitamins are essential to a cat’s growth and for the efficient processing of fats in the body. These vitamins ensure that a cat’s bones are healthy and that they have sufficient protection from disease. Cats are prone to cuts and vitamins can help to repair wounds quickly. Fat-soluble vitamins are vitamins E, D, A, and K. The water-soluble vitamins include the B vitamins (B1, B2, B6, and B12) and vitamin C.

Vitamins are easily absorbed in a cat’s system. Minerals, on the other hand, require that the cat’s system is healthy for proper absorption. Any slight infection can affect a cat’s ability to absorb minerals. The minerals that cats require the most include calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium chloride.

The good news about foods for animals is that they are formulated to meet all the nutritional needs of the animal. Feeding your cat food is typically all that is necessary for them to obtain all the nutrients they need. However, there are some things that can affect the amount of nutrients in cat food. For starters, cat food can lose some of its nutritional value. This often happens if the food is kept on a store shelf for a significant amount of time.

If a stray cat has made its way to your doorstep, the condition of the cat may warrant the need for vitamin and mineral supplementation. Stray cats, especially abandoned kittens are susceptible to infections and diseases. The first step you should make when attempting to care for a stray cat is to have a veterinarian inspect the cat for diseases. The veterinarian will give you instructions for caring for the stray cat, including vitamin and mineral supplementation. You should follow the instructions given to you. An excessive amount of a particular vitamin or mineral can cause a toxic reaction in a cat that could be fatal.

Why not check out our nutrition guide at http://www.nutritional-supplement-guides.com/nut-ebook.html

and also what supplement we personally use for our nutrition needs at http://www.nutritional-supplement-guides.com/what-we-use.html

From Hairballs to Arthritis, Pet Nutritional Supplements Tries to Solve it All

We may have a lot of differences with dogs and cats in terms of anatomy and physiology but it appears we are no different in nutrition development. Just as dietary supplements have become a growing trend for us upright creatures, the current craze for our four-legged friends are nutritional supplements. Although veterinarians and other animal experts don’t seem to see eye to eye regarding this matter, nutritional supplements for pets have become a major force in the animal feed department.

Besides the vast number of producers and distributors of nutritional supplements for pets, these more natural alternatives to pet food come in increasingly specific varieties. Above and beyond the vitamins, minerals typical of a food supplement, there are those with anti-oxidants and immuno-stimulants, digestion and elimination supplements, and high energy nutritional supplements.

Our pets won’t get left behind when it comes to staying slim, too, as there are nutritional supplements for pets that are specifically designed for weight loss! Also, if your kitten or puppy does not get enough milk, there are supplements that act as milk replacer!

There are even nutritional supplements for pets that aid in keeping them well-groomed. Skin/coat supplements and laxatives and hairball treatments make it easier for you to keep your pet always looking trim. Unless you’re one who garbs your pet in cute shirts, their basic all-around outfit is their skin or fur.

In the same way that we suffer stress and pain, our pets do, too. But pet supplements providers have got this covered! There are nutritional supplements for pets that serve to reduce pain, stress, and anxiety. If your pet experiences arthritis and joint pains in particular, there are supplements especially for that! These are said to be pretty helpful also as prevention to strengthen your pet’s bones even before arthritis sets in.

It’s interesting to note the sort of disclaimer that’s always present in the promotional materials. Most nutritional supplements promise a lot of benefits but it’s always balanced off with notices that results may vary depending on your pet’s response. So one might say it doesn’t really guarantee you anything. Pretty consistent with human nutritional supplements. Basically, it leaves you to choose whether to give it a try and see if it works.

There are countless testimonies as to the effectiveness of certain nutritional supplements for pets, some even from certified experts and doctors. But, it’s still you who decides what’s best for your pet. At the very least, giving ALL or a random pick of these supplements might not be a good idea. Consulting your personal veterinarian is.

At the onset, you should consult your veterinarian about the diet of your pet. Some pet specialists argue that nutritional supplements for pets are unnecessary since the formulated pet food already has sufficient nutrients and you only have to choose the best kind for your pet. Whether they are right or not, it is smart to find out what is or what’s not in the food you’re already feeding your pet.

Pig Feeding Guide

Feeding pigs depends a lot on how old the pigs are. If they are reproducing, the state they are in at the time is an indication of how they should be fed. Foraging pigs should be allowed to obtain some food on their own but should also be given supplements to make sure all they get the necessary nutrients. Foraging pigs eat a variety of things they find such as apples, acorns, brambles and since by nature pigs are omnivores they will eat the occasional earthworm. Also any other fruits and vegetables are good for pigs as long as the fruits and vegetables are not from a kitchen. Food from a kitchen or anywhere that meat is sold cannot be given to pigs that are being bred for commercial production under law. More specifically, it is illegal to feed any household waste to pigs that are being bred for production purposes. This is due to the threat of disease from contamination by animal by-products.

Feed supplements help balance the diet of pigs

In addition to these foods a feed supplement should be fed to pigs. Feed supplements are designed to give animals all or part of the daily nutrients they need to be in optimal condition for breeding or commercial production. Feed supplements come in a variety of forms such as pencils, cakes and meal. The supplements are made from combining many of the foods that animals already eat into a balanced mixture.

Feeding pigs changes when they are breeding

Pigs like their food wet. If you are preparing feed for pigs you should add water to moisten the feed, goats milk is also good for this purpose but keep in mind the milk cannot be waste from a kitchen. When feeding pigs it is best to have troughs to help ensure all the pigs get enough food. This may seem unnecessary but when pigs are foraging, the most aggressive pigs get more food and less aggressive pigs sometimes do not get enough to eat. Having pig troughs helps solve this problem.

Gilts should be given supplements to their natural diet, a good choice sow breeder pencils, cakes or meal specifically designed for gilts. This should be kept up until just before the farrowing period. Maiden gilts are in need of a lot of supplements because even though they are caring unborn young, they are still growing. So the guilt maiden will need to have her feed gradually increased until she delivers. After service there is no need to continue the regime. Once the litter is born the sow needs extra supplements to support both her own nutritional needs and to produce enough milk for the suckling piglets.